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Once sailor, forever sailor

Sunday, August 12, 2012

Khu Trục Hạm USS Porter đụng tàu dầu Nhật treo cờ Panama tại eo biển Hormuz


US Navy ship collides with oil tanker in Gulf

By MICHAEL CASEY
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USS Porter
The Associated Press


In this image provided by the U.S. Navy the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) transits the Atlantic Ocean. The U.S. Navy said Sunday Aug. 12, 2012 that the USS Porter collided with the Panamanian-flagged bulk oil tanker M/V Otowasan early Sunday near the Strait of Hormuz but that no one was injured in the accident and overall damage to Porter is being evaluated, but the ship is able to operate under its own power. (AP Photo/US Navy, Seaman Harry Andrew D. Gordon)



In this photo provided by the U.S. Navy, Sunday, Aug. 12, 2012, personnel examine the guided-missile destroyer USS Porter after it was damaged in a collision with the Panamanian flagged, Japanese-owned bulk oil tanker M/V Otowasan in the Strait of Hormuz early Sunday. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy, Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Sunderman)



In this photo provided by the U.S. Navy, Sunday, Aug. 12, 2012, personnel examine the guided-missile destroyer USS Porter after it was damaged in a collision with the Panamanian flagged, Japanese-owned bulk oil tanker M/V Otowasan in the Strait of Hormuz early Sunday. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy, Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Sunderman)



This photo provided by the U.S. Navy, Sunday, Aug. 12, 2012, shows the guided-missile destroyer USS Porter after it was damaged in a collision with the Panamanian flagged, Japanese-owned bulk oil tanker M/V Otowasan in the Strait of Hormuz early Sunday. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy, Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Sunderman)




DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — A U.S. Navy guided missile destroyer was left with a gaping hole on one side after it collided with an oil tanker early Sunday just outside the strategic Strait of Hormuz.

The collision left a breach about 10 feet by 10 feet (three by three meters) in the starboard side of USS Porter. No one was injured on either vessel, the U.S. Navy said in a statement.
The collision with the Panamanian-flagged and Japanese-owned bulk oil tanker M/V Otowasan happened about 1 a.m. local time. Photos released by the Navy showed workers standing amid twisted metal and other debris hanging down from the hole.
The cause of the incident is under investigation, the Navy said, though the collision was not "combat related." There were no reports of spills or leakages from either the USS Porter or the Otowasan, the Navy said.
Navy spokesman Greg Raelson said the destroyer now is in port in Jebel Ali, Dubai. "We're just happy there were no injuries," he said. "An investigation is under way."
The USS Porter is on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet, which is based in Bahrain, an island nation in the Gulf, near Iran.
The Strait of Hormuz, at the mouth of the Gulf, is a crowded and tense waterway where one-fifth of the world's oil is routed. Tensions have risen there over repeated Iranian threats to block tanker traffic in retaliation for tighter sanctions by the West. The sanctions are aimed at persuading Iran to abandon its uranium enrichment program, so far without success.
Tensions in the Strait of Hormuz show no sign of abating.
The United States stoked the flames recently with an announcement that it will send U.S. Navy minesweepers and warships into the Gulf for exercises. The U.S. military maneuvers scheduled for September, to be joined by ships from about 20 American allies.
This is part of a Pentagon buildup in the Gulf with more troops and naval firepower, seeking to rattle Iran and reassure Saudi Arabia and Washington's other Gulf Arab partners worried about Iran's influence and power.
Iranian commanders and political leaders have stepped up threats and defiant statements in recent weeks over the Strait of Hormuz.
While it appears unlikely that Iran is ready to risk an almost certain military backlash by trying to close Hormuz — which is jointly controlled with Oman — the comments from Tehran show that Iranian authorities see the strait as perhaps their most valuable asset in brinkmanship over tightening sanctions.
Iranian officials have been quick to counter statements about closing the strait with observations that the situation is not likely to become that severe, indicating recognition that a step like closing the strait would have grave implications.
Warnings from Tehran in the past about possible closure have been enough to boost oil prices to offset the blow of sanctions. It's also among the potential flashpoints if military force is used against Iran over its nuclear program.
If attacked, Iran could severely disrupt oil supplies and send the shaky global economy stumbling backward again.
Three years ago, The USS Hartford, a nuclear-powered submarine based in Groton, Conn., collided in the strait with the USS New Orleans, a San Diego-based amphibious ship.
The New Orleans' fuel tank was ruptured, and 15 sailors on the Hartford suffered minor injuries. The collision caused $2.3 million in damage to the New Orleans, and the cost so far of repairs to the Hartford is $102.6 million.
The submarine's commanding officer was relieved of his duties, and the sub's chief of the boat, an adviser to the commanding officer, was reassigned. Several crew members were punished.


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Commander Martin F. Arriola 
Commanding Officer

Bio Image
Commander Martin F. Arriola graduated from the United States Merchant Marine Academy in 1992 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Marine Engineering and a commission in the U.S. Naval Reserve-Inactive Ready Reserve (Merchant Marine Reserve Program). After graduation, CDR Arriola worked for Exxon Corporation in Guam as a Bulk Fuels Terminal Supervisor. In September 1995, CDR Arriola voluntarily commenced Active Duty service.
After completing the Surface Warfare Officer School (SWOS) Division Officer training pipeline, CDR Arriola reported to USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (CVN 73) for his first division officer tour from April 1996 to October 1997 and served as Repair Division Officer, Assistant DCA, and Electrical Division Officer. After completing AEGIS and Tomahawk Strike training, CDR Arriola reported to USS BARRY (DDG 52) as Fire Control Officer and Strike Officer from March 1998 to December 2000. After completing the SWOS Department Head training pipeline, CDR Arriola reported to USS LABOON (DDG 58) as Weapons Control Officer and Combat Systems Officer from January 2002 to September 2004. CDR Arriola reported for duty and served as Flag Secretary and Assistant Chief of Staff for Administration and Personnel (N1) on the staff of Commander, Carrier Strike Group EIGHT (CCSG-8) from October 2004 to April 2006. During this tour, he volunteered as an Individual Augmentee with the Civilian Police Assistance Training Team of the Multi-National Security Transition Command - Iraq where he worked with Special Police Transition Teams and Ministry of Interior headquarters staff to train and equip Iraqi police forces. After completing the SWOS Executive Officer training pipeline, CDR Arriola reported to DDG Crew LIMA aboard USS STOUT (DDG 55) as Executive Officer from August 2006 to December 2007. During this tour, DDG Crew LIMA completed the final phase of the Atlantic Fleet DDG Sea Swap initiative.
In December 2007, CDR Arriola was selected to attend the College of Naval Warfare at the Naval War College. He earned a Masters degree in National Security Affairs and Strategic Studies in addition to completing Joint Professional Military Education Phase I and Phase II requirements.
CDR Arriola’s duty ashore was with Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic as the Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, Plans and Policy (N3) from March 2010 to January 2011. His sea duty includes participation in various campaign and contingency operations as well as numerous multi-national exercises with foreign navies. His personal decorations include the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal (three awards), the Joint Service Achievement Medal, the Navy Achievement Medal, and various unit, campaign and service awards.
 


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http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2012/08/uss-porter-collides-with-oil-tanker-in-persian-gulf/


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